Supporting Students with a Head Injury

Information For Educators:
After having a head injury, students may experience a variety of physical symptoms that persist after the initial diagnosis. These may include headaches, nausea, balance problems, dizziness, fatigue, and sensory sensitivity. Following doctor’s orders is always the best medicine, but there are some simple accommodations that can be provided for students who continue to experience physical symptoms. For example, if students get headaches due to light sensitivity, the use of sunglasses in class may be useful. If your student expresses fatigue, allow them to rest in a quiet area for a short amount of time. If your student is sensitive to noise, let them have an early or late class dismissal and/or eat lunch in an area other than the busy cafeteria. If a student is nauseous or vomiting, it’s important to call their parents immediately. Any of the following symptoms are considered “red flags” and require emergency medical evaluation: worsening headaches, unusual behavior changes, increasing irritability, increasing neck pain, seizures, loss of consciousness, slurred speech, repeated vomiting, increasing confusion, weakness in arms or legs. Work with your school nurse to address your student’s physical needs via a Medical Care Plan.

Information For Parents:
After having a head injury, your student may experience a variety of physical symptoms that persist after the initial diagnosis. These may include headaches, nausea, balance problems, dizziness, fatigue, and sensory sensitivity. Following doctor’s orders is always the best medicine, but there are some simple accommodations that schools can provide for students who continue to experience physical symptoms. For example, if your student gets headaches due to light sensitivity, the use of sunglasses in class may be useful. If your student expresses fatigue, allowing them to rest in a quiet area for a short amount of time would be a good strategy. If your student is sensitive to noise, letting them have an early or late class dismissal and/or allowing them to eat lunch in an area other than the busy cafeteria could be warranted. If a student is nauseous or vomiting, it’s important for the school to call you immediately. You can contact your school nurse to address your student’s physical needs and they can help create a Medical Care Plan.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s