Summer Workshops at Shodor still available!

For 6th-12th graders who like Computers, Math & Science

For middle and high school students who are interested in COMPUTERS, MATH and/or SCIENCE, Shodor offers a variety of explorations to satisfy their intellectual appetites during time away from school this summer.

Middle and high school students attend separate workshops during the week Monday – Friday
Most workshops are half-day sessions
(9 a.m. – noon) and (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
Some are full day sessions (9 a.m. – 4 p.m.).
To register and for more information, go to: http://www.shodor.org/calendar

Summer 2014 WORKSHOPS:

High School (rising 9th-12th)
6/16 – 6/20 Programming Concepts
and Web Design
6/23 – 6/27 Advanced Programming Concepts
and Modeling Your World

7/14 – 7/18 Explorations in Engineering at Sigma Xi

7/28 – 8/1 Intro to iPhone App Development
and Parallel Universe
8/4 – 8/15 Shodor Scholars Program

Middle School (rising 6th-8th)

6/16 – 6/20 Explorations In Engineering at Sigma Xi
and Math Explorations at Sigma Xi

7/14 – 7/18 Forensic Science Investigations
and Modeling Your World

7/21 – 7/25 Computer Programming Concepts
and Web Design
To register and for more information, go to: http://www.shodor.org/calendar

* It is the policy of The Shodor that no otherwise qualified student should be discouraged from participation due to financial circumstances.
Financial assistance is available for all programs.

ABOUT SHODOR:

Shodor is a non profit organization and a national resource for computational science education based in Durham, NC, serving students and educators nationwide. Its mission is improving math and science education through the use of computational science (scientific computing) – modeling and simulation technologies. Locally, Shodor offers programs – workshops, apprenticeships and internships- for youth and teens to build excitement for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through interactive explorations using hands-on and computer-enhanced activities, giving them the experience they will need to pursue a technology- intensive career path.

Shodor is located in downtown Durham, in the Golden Belt complex. Location & direction information can be found at: http://www.shodor.org/parents/directions

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Internet Safety Part II

downloadAs school counselors, we often discuss the importance of internet safety. Parents please take a look at this interactive tool: http://www.takethislollipop.com.  You must have an active facebook account in order to participate. Also, please make sure your children are utilizing the safety measures listed in the previous post about internet safety.

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Internet Safety Rules

  1. Ask your parents’ permission before using your full name, address, telephone number, or school name anywhere on the internet.
  2. Tell your parents or guardian if you see something online that you know is wrong or makes you feel uncomfortable.
  3. Don’t respond to messages that make you feel uncomfortable or uneasy.
  4. Never give out a credit card number or password online.
  5. Never send our your picture without your parents’ permission.
  6. Be careful when someone offers your something for nothing, such as gifts or money.
  7. Don’t ever accept a gift or an offer that involves having someone visit your house.
  8. Never arrange to meet someone you’ve met online in person unless you discuss it with your parents and an adult goes with you.
  9. Talk to your parents to set up rules for going online. Decide with them the best time to be online, and appropriate areas to visit.
  10. Get to know your “online friends” just as you get to know all of your other friends. Be sure that you are dealing with someone that you and your parents know and trust before giving out any personal information about yourself via e-mail.
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Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying happens on web sites, in chat rooms, in blogs, through e-mail, on voicemail, and through text messages. 

The definition of cyberbullying is: The use of different forms of technology to hurt, embarass, or ridicule a person. 

A cyberbully can be a schoolmate, former friend, or complete stranger. Here are some steps you can take to prevent cyberbullying: 

  • Ignore the bully. You do not have to respond to a bully’s text or e-mail. 
  • Block messages. Block e-mail addresses, screen names, or phone numbers. 
  • Save threatening e-mails or texts  to help identify the bully. 
  • If threats are made, ask an adult to call the police. 
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School Psychology Awareness Week

My name is Sarah Hamel, and I am the School Psychologist at Leesville Middle School. Helping our students and schools focus on recognizing and developing team players is at the heart of national School Psychology Awareness Week, November 11–15, 2013.  The theme, “We’re all in!  Teams work.” is directed to students, but also carries an important message to all adults. Parents you can help us build and celebrate your children’s participation on teams and building effective teamwork!

  • Discover effective team building skills your children already have (explore your child’s team building skills and how they differ from those of others).
  • Encourage family discussions regarding the teams in which the adults and the children participate.  Be sure to highlight individual team building strengths across all family members; everyone’s collaborative skills may be different but they are all important to share.
  • Come together for a good cause.  Show the strength of working together as a family, a group, or a team to help the community.
  • Join a team!  Model effective team work by joining a team or group such as the PTA, coaching a recreational team, or even joining a book club.  Help your children understand the qualities needed to be an effective team player by watching you participate in a variety of teams.
  • Use your team work skills to make a difference.  Give students the opportunity volunteer with a local cause such as Special Olympics, local fundraising campaigns, or Habitat for Humanity.  They may be surprised how much of a difference they can make using effective team work skills.

A student’s life at school is filled with many opportunities to learn, grow, and excel.  Children can develop and improve their skills across several academic, social, athletic, or musical areas in education.  Participating in an academic team, recreational team, or educational group can enhance a child’s school experience.  Teaching our children the importance of building relationships through positive teaming helps them to develop interpersonal skills and a commitment to the group.

Acknowledgements and encouragement from educators and parents are essential to making school an enjoyable place to learn and help children to achieve their individual goals.  Identifying and sharing effective team building skills, and the interpersonal skills necessary to work collaboratively with peers and adults, can build resiliency in children as well as the ability to meet challenges successfully.

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Supporting Students with a Head Injury

Information For Educators:
After having a head injury, students may experience a variety of physical symptoms that persist after the initial diagnosis. These may include headaches, nausea, balance problems, dizziness, fatigue, and sensory sensitivity. Following doctor’s orders is always the best medicine, but there are some simple accommodations that can be provided for students who continue to experience physical symptoms. For example, if students get headaches due to light sensitivity, the use of sunglasses in class may be useful. If your student expresses fatigue, allow them to rest in a quiet area for a short amount of time. If your student is sensitive to noise, let them have an early or late class dismissal and/or eat lunch in an area other than the busy cafeteria. If a student is nauseous or vomiting, it’s important to call their parents immediately. Any of the following symptoms are considered “red flags” and require emergency medical evaluation: worsening headaches, unusual behavior changes, increasing irritability, increasing neck pain, seizures, loss of consciousness, slurred speech, repeated vomiting, increasing confusion, weakness in arms or legs. Work with your school nurse to address your student’s physical needs via a Medical Care Plan.

Information For Parents:
After having a head injury, your student may experience a variety of physical symptoms that persist after the initial diagnosis. These may include headaches, nausea, balance problems, dizziness, fatigue, and sensory sensitivity. Following doctor’s orders is always the best medicine, but there are some simple accommodations that schools can provide for students who continue to experience physical symptoms. For example, if your student gets headaches due to light sensitivity, the use of sunglasses in class may be useful. If your student expresses fatigue, allowing them to rest in a quiet area for a short amount of time would be a good strategy. If your student is sensitive to noise, letting them have an early or late class dismissal and/or allowing them to eat lunch in an area other than the busy cafeteria could be warranted. If a student is nauseous or vomiting, it’s important for the school to call you immediately. You can contact your school nurse to address your student’s physical needs and they can help create a Medical Care Plan.

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Traumatic Brain Injury Prevention

Falls and motor vehicle crashes are the most common causes of brain injury in school-age children.  However, participation in sports frequently results in brain injury, primarily concussion.  There are many ways to reduce the chances that you or your child will sustain a brain injury or concussion.  For example…

 In a vehicle:

• Ensure your child wears seatbelt when driving (teens) or riding in a motor vehicle.

• At all times, use a car seat or booster for children less than 8 years old.

• Never drive or ride with someone under the influence of alcohol or drugs. 

During play or sports:

• Wear a helmet when riding any kind of bike, scooter, skateboard or all-terrain vehicle.

• During athletic games and practices, make sure your child uses correct protective equipment and follows safety rules of sport.

• Do not return to play with a known or suspected concussion until you have been evaluated and given permission by an appropriate health care professional. 

• Make sure the surface on your child’s playground is appropriate and maintained. 

At home:

• Install window guards to keep young children from falling out of open windows.

• Use safety gates at the top and bottom of stairs.

• Keep stairs clear of clutter.

• Secure rugs and use rubber mats in bathtubs and never leave child unattended.

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